ABPI - Resources for Schools



"A fantastic resource on the history of medicine through time. Absolutely first class presentation and information - perfect for GCSE study. Goes through the major developments of each age. Brilliant!"

- Teacher

Human genome project

Age range 14-16 Age range 16-19

Page 7 of 8

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Who should know about your genes?

Imagine a time in the not-too-far-distant future, when each of us has our own DNA profile on computer, carried with us at all times, available to any hospital if needed.

This information will include any genetic diseases we may have, along with our tendency to develop problems like diabetes, heart disease, cancers of various sorts, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease … What is more, our DNA profile will provide information about whether we are more likely than average to become an alcoholic or drug addict, turn to smoking, seek out extra sexual partners or put on lots of weight.

Activity

Our doctors need information about us to help them to work with us to keep us as healthy as possible for as long as possible. But who else needs to know? For each of the people or organisations on this list below, give all the reasons you can think of why

a) they should, and
b) they should not

have access to the information from your genes.

People who may want information about your genetic makeup:

  1. Your partner

  2. Your employer

  3. Your potential employer

  4. The company who insure your life

  5. Your bank

  6. Friends from work

  7. Your children


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