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Quiz

Select the correct answer from the multi-choices below. When you have answered all 8 questions you can check your answers by clicking the button below.

1. What do the initials PCR stand for?
polymerised chain reading
polymerase chain reaction
polymer counting reaction
polymerase chain reading
polymerised chain reading
(The correct answer is:
'polymerase chain reaction')
polymerase chain reaction
polymer counting reaction
(The correct answer is:
'polymerase chain reaction')
polymerase chain reading
(The correct answer is:
'polymerase chain reaction')
2. Who invented PCR?
Francis Crick
James Watson
Charles Darwin
Kary B Mullis
Francis Crick
The correct answer is d) Kary B Mullis – Crick and Watson discovered the structure of DNA and Darwin developed the theory of evolution by natural selection.
James Watson
The correct answer is d) Kary B Mullis – Crick and Watson discovered the structure of DNA and Darwin developed the theory of evolution by natural selection.
Charles Darwin
The correct answer is d) Kary B Mullis – Crick and Watson discovered the structure of DNA and Darwin developed the theory of evolution by natural selection.
Kary B Mullis
Crick and Watson discovered the structure of DNA and Darwin developed the theory of evolution by natural selection.
3. For what specific purpose is PCR used?
to amplify DNA
to magnify DNA
to analyse DNA
to sequence DNA
to amplify DNA
- magnification simply means making it look bigger, whilst PCR actually makes more copies of the DNA. PCR is often used to produce the material used in the process of analysing and sequencing DNA.
to magnify DNA
The correct answer is a) amplify DNA – magnification simply means making it look bigger, whilst PCR actually makes more copies of the DNA. PCR is often used to produce the material used in the process of analysing and sequencing DNA.
to analyse DNA
The correct answer is a) amplify DNA – magnification simply means making it look bigger, whilst PCR actually makes more copies of the DNA. PCR is often used to produce the material used in the process of analysing and sequencing DNA.
to sequence DNA
The correct answer is a) amplify DNA – magnification simply means making it look bigger, whilst PCR actually makes more copies of the DNA. PCR is often used to produce the material used in the process of analysing and sequencing DNA.
4. Which of the following best describes the mixture placed in a PCR vial at the beginning of the PCR procedure?
the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, fluorescent-tagged bases and buffer solution
the original DNA sample, endonucleases, the four nucleotide bases and primers
the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, the four nucleotide bases and primers
the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine
the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, fluorescent-tagged bases and buffer solution
The correct answer is c) the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, the four nucleotide bases and primers. Fluorescent tags are used in RT-PCR and in DNA sequencing, whilst endonucleases are important enzymes in the process of genetic engineering. Primers are needed in the mixture to begin the replication sequence of the DNA.
the original DNA sample, endonucleases, the four nucleotide bases and primers
The correct answer is c) the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, the four nucleotide bases and primers. Fluorescent tags are used in RT-PCR and in DNA sequencing, whilst endonucleases are important enzymes in the process of genetic engineering. Primers are needed in the mixture to begin the replication sequence of the DNA.
the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, the four nucleotide bases and primers
Fluorescent tags are used in RT-PCR and in DNA sequencing, whilst endonucleases are important enzymes in the process of genetic engineering. Primers are needed in the mixture to begin the replication sequence of the DNA.
the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine
The correct answer is c) the original DNA sample, DNA polymerase, the four nucleotide bases and primers. Fluorescent tags are used in RT-PCR and in DNA sequencing, whilst endonucleases are important enzymes in the process of genetic engineering. Primers are needed in the mixture to begin the replication sequence of the DNA.
5. The second stage of the PCR process is carried out at 90-95oC for 30 seconds. What happens to the DNA at this temperature?
the DNA strands separate
the primers bind to the single DNA strands
DNA polymerase adds bases to the primer segments to build up complimentary strands of DNA
the PCR process repeats itself
the DNA strands separate
The mixture is only maintained at this stage for 30 seconds before moving on.
the primers bind to the single DNA strands
The correct answer is a) the DNA strands separate. The mixture is only maintained at this stage for 30 seconds before moving on.
DNA polymerase adds bases to the primer segments to build up complimentary strands of DNA
The correct answer is a) the DNA strands separate. The mixture is only maintained at this stage for 30 seconds before moving on.
the PCR process repeats itself
The correct answer is a) the DNA strands separate. The mixture is only maintained at this stage for 30 seconds before moving on.
6. What is the optimum temperature for the enzyme DNA polymerase used in the PCR process?
40oC
55oC
75oC
90oC
40oC
The correct answer is c) 75oC – the enzyme is extracted from a bacterium Thermus aquaticus which lives in the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. This is why it’s optimum temperature is so much higher than any mammalian enzymes.
55oC
The correct answer is c) 75oC – the enzyme is extracted from a bacterium Thermus aquaticus which lives in the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. This is why it’s optimum temperature is so much higher than any mammalian enzymes.
75oC
- the enzyme is extracted from a bacterium Thermus aquaticus which lives in the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. This is why it’s optimum temperature is so much higher than any mammalian enzymes.
90oC
The correct answer is c) 75oC – the enzyme is extracted from a bacterium Thermus aquaticus which lives in the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. This is why it’s optimum temperature is so much higher than any mammalian enzymes.
7. The three main stages of the PCR process are usually repeated around 30 times over several hours. Approximately how many copies of the original DNA molecule are made during that time?
100,000
1,000,000
10,000,000
1,000,000,000
100,000
The correct answer is d) 1 billion – as long as the mixture of reactants contains plenty of nucleotide bases, primers and DNA polymerase the amount of DNA doubles every few minutes.
1,000,000
The correct answer is d) 1 billion – as long as the mixture of reactants contains plenty of nucleotide bases, primers and DNA polymerase the amount of DNA doubles every few minutes.
10,000,000
The correct answer is d) 1 billion – as long as the mixture of reactants contains plenty of nucleotide bases, primers and DNA polymerase the amount of DNA doubles every few minutes.
1,000,000,000
- as long as the mixture of reactants contains plenty of nucleotide bases, primers and DNA polymerase the amount of DNA doubles every few minutes.
8. The development of PCR has had a major impact on a number of different areas. It has led to some major developments in medicine and forensic science, some of which are still in the early stages. Which of the following technologies does NOT rely on the PCR reaction?
detecting infective organisms using DNA
amplifying tiny fragments of DNA for analysis in the detection of crime
identifying cancerous changes in cells before the cancer has grown and become incurable
DNA fingerprinting
detecting infective organisms using DNA
The correct answer is d) DNA fingerprinting. This involves sequencing the DNA and although it is often carried out on DNA that has been amplified using PCR, the technique was developed before PCR and can be used without PCR when there are relatively large, fresh samples of DNA available.
amplifying tiny fragments of DNA for analysis in the detection of crime
The correct answer is d) DNA fingerprinting. This involves sequencing the DNA and although it is often carried out on DNA that has been amplified using PCR, the technique was developed before PCR and can be used without PCR when there are relatively large, fresh samples of DNA available.
identifying cancerous changes in cells before the cancer has grown and become incurable
The correct answer is d) DNA fingerprinting. This involves sequencing the DNA and although it is often carried out on DNA that has been amplified using PCR, the technique was developed before PCR and can be used without PCR when there are relatively large, fresh samples of DNA available.
DNA fingerprinting
- this involves sequencing the DNA and although it is often carried out on DNA that has been amplified using PCR, the technique was developed before PCR and can be used without PCR when there are relatively large, fresh samples of DNA available.