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This topic takes on average 55 minutes to read.

There are a number of interactive features in this resource:

Topic last updated: 24 Nov 2021
    • Ico Chemistry Chemistry
    • Ico Science Science
    • 14-16
    • 55

Medicine box challenge

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Medicine box challenge

Interactive Periodic Table

Learn about the periodic table through this interactive game.

The game allows you to explore patterns and trends to understand why the Periodic Table is set out in the way it is.

The periodic table was created by Professor Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869 using the properties of known elements. The Periodic Table organises the elements so that elements with similar properties are in the same column ('Group'), with elements across a row ('Period') shown in order of increasing atomic number. So the Periodic Table links the structure of the atoms of an element with its properties.

Many other interactive periodic tables are available on the web; you can learn more about elements in the Periodic Table in the Visual Elements table from the Royal Society of Chemistry and this photographic one.

Periodic table activity

The interactive Periodic Table helps you learn about elements and their properties in a fun way. The game can be played at a variety of levels of difficulty and in several different ways. It can be played against the clock or competitively by one or more people.

 

Use the information provided to help you place the element in its correct position.

Periodic table activity

The interactive Periodic Table helps you learn about elements and their properties in a fun way. The game can be played at a variety of levels of difficulty and in several different ways. It can be played against the clock or competitively by one or more people.

Use the information provided to help you place the element in its correct position.

First of all the solid has to dissolve in the water in the stomach, then it has to cross the wall of the stomach and then it must pass into the water of the blood stream. All of our cells are covered in a fatty membrane and drugs have to pass through this. Therefore, drugs which are absorbed well must have solubility in both water and fats otherwise they can not cross these barriers. Use the animation below to see how a medicine could cross a cell membrane through the processes of diffusionosmosis and active transport.

How often should you take doses of medicine?

How well a drug works and how long it acts for depends on how much there is in the blood stream (the concentration in the blood). This concentration varies with time depending on how quickly it gets from the stomach and how quickly your body gets rid of it. It is just like trying to fill a bath with a leaking plug - as some goes in part of it runs out.

Imagine what happens to the level of water in the bath if you gently pour one whole bucket of water in. The level goes up quickly but then starts to drop as the water leaks out. It is the same with levels of drug in your blood. Just think of the bucket of water being a tablet of drug.

Different medicines have different blood level profiles. These profiles depend upon their relative rates of absorption from the stomach and loss through being broken down by the kidneys and liver.